Holmes and Watson End Peace

Holmes and Watson End Peace Sherlock Holmes to Watson Stand with me here upon the terrace for it may be the last quiet talk that we shall ever have A small hospital somewhere in Dorset An ante room off a dimly lit corr

  • Title: Holmes and Watson End Peace
  • Author: David Ruffle
  • ISBN: 9781780921860
  • Page: 220
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1915 Sherlock Holmes to Watson Stand with me here upon the terrace for it may be the last quiet talk that we shall ever have 1929 A small hospital somewhere in Dorset An ante room off a dimly lit corridor It is night and there is not even the smallest amount of light penetrating the room In the room itself a dim light enables us to see a figure in a bed The pipes1915 Sherlock Holmes to Watson Stand with me here upon the terrace for it may be the last quiet talk that we shall ever have 1929 A small hospital somewhere in Dorset An ante room off a dimly lit corridor It is night and there is not even the smallest amount of light penetrating the room In the room itself a dim light enables us to see a figure in a bed The pipes, tubes and all the trappings we associate with keeping someone alive have been removed The man, for it is a man, lies prone and still Still, but not silent 1929 The last quiet talk.

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      Published :2019-03-25T05:13:56+00:00

    One thought on “Holmes and Watson End Peace”

    1. In this book we meet our favorite characters once again, but this time instead of the setting being around the fireplace is 221B Baker Street, it is in a quite nursing home in the year 1929. Here we find Watson "still, but not silent," lying on what will soon become his death bed. His health has deteriorated and we now find a frail old man where there used to be such life and vigor. But there we also find Sherlock Holmes sitting by his bedside to keep him company and reminisce about all that the [...]

    2. Holmes And Watson End Peace by David Ruffle is a short but very moving and evocative story which details a conversation between Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson. It takes place in a nursing home in 1929 where Dr Watson is being cared for. The cover for the book is superbly simple, a deerstalker and medical bag. For any reader of Sherlock Holmes the symbolism is obvious and it does set the tone for the book. This is a story about Holmes and Watson. No one else is involved.Holmes and Watson End Peace [...]

    3. I don't read Sherlock Holmes pastiches – I write them, and I avoid reading pastiches on the whole, for fear I will inadvertently copy someone else's ideas. But having read about End Peace, I thought I could risk this work.It's a fascinating concept in the technical sense - a book that is all dialogue with no description at all. To describe it as a "novel" is perhaps a mistake. It's a work of Holmesian scholarship, examining the details of one of the most famous fictional relationships in Engli [...]

    4. Love the dialogue-only form! It makes for a very different, very intimate read, which is perfect for this kind of story. I'm not entirely sure if I can really agree with everything David Ruffle created for their past, but in the overall picture it works. In the end, End Peace is a wonderful and very poignant read, the kind of story that will break your heart and one of the pastiches, which are definitely worth reading!

    5. I've recently finished “Holmes And Watson: End Peace” by David Ruffle. I couldn't wait to share my thoughts on this very innovatively written little masterpiece. So here goes…End Peace is filled with nothing but my favorite part of any Sherlock Holmes pastiche, dialogue. This fascinating book is literally 100% dialogue, it reads like an actual transcript of one long conversation and is completely delightful to digest.The book takes place at the very end of Holmes and Watson’s years toget [...]

    6. A short (about 114 pages) novel (all conversation, no action) relating the death of Sherlock Holmes' friend and chronicler Dr. John H. Watson in a nursing home in 1929. [WARNING: SPOILERS AHEAD] All of the talking (except that of the nurses) is between Watson and Holmes reminiscing about their lives and the adventures they shared. The author is well-up on his Canonical knowledge but goes way too far afield when our heroes each reveal they committed a murder in their younger days (obviously apocr [...]

    7. I am such a sucker for post retirement Holmes and Watson stories. That being said, this is really well written. The story is entirely dialog, but the words flow with the same formal Victorian grace that the originals were written with. It is a quick read, coming in at 118 pages including the afterward, but filled with content. It IS definitely geared toward the obsessive fan, with many unexplained references; easily understood by a devotee but probably incomprehensible to a casual fan. Lets be h [...]

    8. Read this one after having read this author's "An Evening in Baker Street". Both are exclusively dialogue. Both are pretty light weight. I probably will not read another of Ruffle's Sherlock stories.This one has Watson on his death bed, and Holmes there in Watson's imagination -- or maybe not. This could have been an interesting thread -- but it leads nowhere. Revelations at the end of secrets in both men's lives were intended to be plot highlights.

    9. The Holmes and Watson in this book really didn't feel like themselves at all. I'm surprised at all the positive comments for this since, to me, it felt much weaker than many fanfics I've read. It wasn't awful, but it didn't at all feel like the characters we've come to know and love through ACD, films, TV or any of the myriad options out there that have explored this relationship.

    10. I really enjoyed the conversation between Holmes and Watson. Nicely done, David. You did a great job of turning the entire book into all conversation and playing out how it would all end. I was quite pleased. So glad I was able to get the book.

    11. An interesting exercise, but it didn't really grab me. I'm a complete sucker for anything with Holmes or Watson in their old age, but this one lacked something.

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